I Looked Pregnant…but it was SIBO


Let’s rewind.  February 2013, I noticed that I’d become more bloated than usual after a hearty meal.  I experienced a feeling of pressure in my stomach, as well as visceral pain, both of which converged to create a really uncomfortable experience.   I also had GERD, and my heart felt fiery.  My xiphoid process felt irritated.  I was a hot digestive mess.  


As uncomfortable as it was, I kept my cool.  It was only a few weeks later, when I looked down towards the floor and couldn’t see my own feet, that I gasped with every ounce of guttural energy I had in reserve.  I looked six months pregnant.  


I used my hands to cradle my inflamed belly and I cried.  I cried for so many reasons: the pain, the discomfort, the cruel joke of hearing my biological clock tick so loud I thought I’d go deaf.  I only looked pregnant, but wasn’t.  Was this some kind of phantom pregnancy?  Was that even a thing?  Was I about to be catapulted into psychological stardom with my new discovery? This faux-preggers state was characterized by the undoubted lack of a fetus, but a great yearning for one, and a belly the size of six-month gestational equivalence.


I went to the doctor.   Gave her a history, which was mostly sparse, except for the few things I seem to always be relaying to doctors.  I felt lethargic and tired all the time, and I couldn’t seem to ever get enough sleep.  I never woke up feeling rested. Overall, I’m healthy, and thankfully so, but there’s health and then there’s “HEALTH.”  The difference is the same as that between surviving and thriving.  I prefer to do the latter.   


My diagnosis: Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), which had nonchalantly decided to go camping in my gut, like a pesky parasite sucking the life out of every ounce of normal flora to be found.  Camping: as in pitching tents, and starting fires, and sleeping in the dark hollows of my alimentary organs.


The road to wellness began with self-compassion.  Then, I changed my diet, and embarked on a journey consisting of many lifestyle changes. This was both extraordinarily cathartic and vulnerable to write.  Yet, as a mind-body-brain wellness advocate I truly think it is incumbent upon me to share my journey.  Why?  Well, because my journey is what catapulted me towards the process of researching, reading, conversing, asking, anything I could about the topic.  Gut health became a focus of not only my own, but of my practice with my patients.

I am blown away by the connection between mind, body, brain and gut.  In fact, the gut is so powerful, and exerts so much impact upon our daily lives, that it’s even been dubbed the second brain.  For me, knowing there is a real live brain in my gut makes me think twice about what I put in it, and I’ve never felt better.


Check out my next post here on Further Food-I’m going to keep it raw and real, but will get much more technical and science-y about the importance of gut health.



Note: PLEASE consult with  your doctor before making any changes to your diet or medications. The material on this site is provided for educational purposes only, and is not to be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.


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