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Melinda Winner

Condition: Rheumatoid Arthritis, Fibromyalgia, Osteoarthritis, Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome (RSDS), Thyroid Disease, Degenerative Disk Disease

Diagnosed Year: Early twenties to thirties

Foods I Love:

Frozen Yogurt
Homemade cupcakes
Veggie burgers
Fresh fruit smoothies
Chicken stir fry

Foods I Avoid:

Liver
Processed sugar
Fast food
Canned tuna/salmon
Fried food
Steak

My Story

Being diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis in my early twenties was a difficult blow to handle. A few years later I was diagnosed with fibromyalgia, degenerative disk disease, thyroid disease, and severe reflux disorder. I was in despair. My weight and state of mind spiraled out of control. I had gained over 100 pounds. As I lay on the couch in horrible pain, my life was passing me by as were my children’s lives. One day my toddler asked me to play on the floor with him and I cried because I knew I could not do that. I knew at that moment I had to change my life or die.

I made a conscious choice to make a drastic lifestyle change. Each day I would cut down my portions a little more and subtract an unhealthy food choice. I began to journal. I logged the foods I consumed and how I felt after eating them both physically and emotionally. I began walking. At first, it was literally steps with the addition of more steps each day. After a month I began to measure in ½ miles, and then miles. After a year, I was able to lose 110 pounds, and much of my joint pain disappeared. I replaced cups of peanut butter a day with tablespoons of fresh almonds, jelly or sugar with honey, cow’s milk with almond milk, and bad carbs for good carbs like sweet potatoes and brown rice. I even revamped my beloved sweets into new, healthier recipes. I’m often asked if there is a special diet I followed to lose weight or to control my autoimmune arthritis, and the answer unfortunately is no. Everyone is different and how an illness affects your body is different. However, the good news is that lifestyle changes are extremely helpful and aid to control chronic illness and weight.

Almost 20 years later, I have maintained my healthy lifestyle and kept my rheumatoid arthritis at a manageable level. If I could leave you with a piece of hope it would be that it is possible to live a normal life with RA, it’s just a new normal with balance.

 

 

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