Bone Broth (Low FODMAP)

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If you have IBS, then you are most likely also dealing with a leaky gut. Bone broth is not only delicious, but it also contains very important gut healing collagen. Store bought bone broth, however, is typically made with onions. Use this recipe to enjoy all the healing benefits of bone broths, without the carbohydrates that feed bad bacteria in our small intestines.

Further Food Nutritionist Commentary:

Onions are a high FODMAP food, meaning they contain a certain type of carbohydrate that can be difficult for individuals with IBS to digest properly. Carrots, on the other hand, are a low FODMAP option that are digested easily, and work well for broth. If you are trying to follow a low FODMAP diet, I highly recommended that you work with a dietitian. This is important because the low FODMAP diet can be complicated and requires removal and addition of foods that should be done with guidance.

This bone broth contains a lot of vitamin A & C. Vitamin A plays an important role in our vision, skin integrity, and immunity. Vitamin C is a key player in immunity. This recipe also provides 28% of your daily iron needs, which is a good way to get your iron if you have anemia. Iron helps to deliver oxygen to all of the cells in your body. This bone broth is also a good low-sodium choice to use when making soups and stews, or to add flavor while cooking veggies or rice.

By Alex Lane, MS, RDN/LD

Bone Broth (Low FODMAP)

  • Prep Time: 5 minutes
  • Cook Time: 6 hours
  • Servings: 6

Ingredients

2-3 pounds of chicken bones (When I spatchcock chickens, I save the spines and offal in the freezer. Usually four spines will do the trick. Otherwise, you can easily buy chicken bones from your local butcher)

1 large carrot

1 bunch of fresh thyme

1 bunch of fresh parsley

6 quarts water

Instructions

  1. If using a slow cooker, put all of the ingredients into the pot, fill with water, cover and set on high for 6 hours.
  2. If using a large pot (8 quarts) on the stove, put all of the ingredients into the pot, fill with about 6 quarts of water, and bring to a boil. Then, turn down the heat to medium-low so that you have a slow simmer. Cover and let simmer for 6 hours.
  3. When your broth is done, remove from the heat, remove the bones, carrot and herbs, uncover and let cool until you can begin transferring to a storage container (I use large, glass mason jars). Strain the broth into the containers and enjoy within one week.

Photo Credit: Shikha Sharma

If using a slow cooker, put all of the ingredients into the pot, fill with water, cover and set on high for 6 hours. If using a large pot (8 quarts) on the stove, put all of the ingredients into the pot, fill with about 6 quarts of water, and bring to a boil. Then, turn down the heat to medium-low so that you have a slow simmer. Cover and let simmer for 6 hours. When your broth is done, remove from the heat, remove the bones, carrot and herbs, uncover and let cool until you can begin transferring to a storage container (I use large, glass mason jars). Strain the broth into the containers and enjoy within one week. Photo Credit: Shikha Sharma

Nutrition Information

Per Serving:  Calories: 47; Total Fat: 1g; Saturated Fat: 0g; Monounsaturated Fat: 1g; Polyunsaturated Fat: 0g; Cholesterol: 0mg; Sodium: 88mg; Potassium: 522mg; Carbohydrate: 6g; Fiber: 3g; Sugar: 2g; Protein: 6g

Nutrition Bonus:  Vit C: 178%; Vit A: 146%; Iron: 28%; Calcium: 12%

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7 thoughts on “Bone Broth (Low FODMAP)

  1. Beth McHugh

    Do you know if I can buy any Turkey or chicken bone broth made without garlic and onions? I would like to buy it premade but I cant find one without onions and garlic. Thank you so much for your help.

    Reply
  2. Grace

    Thank you. Could I put it in ice cube trays and then in a zip lock as needed? Will it last a month or so in the freezer? And do you have a beef bone broth recipe just like this one. Thank you so much.

    Reply
    1. SlaterR Post author

      Grace,

      Most definitely you can put them in ice cube trays! They will definitely last a month if you have a cover over the trays.

      I don’t have a beef broth recipe because, to tell the truth, beef bone broth is way too intense for my pallet. That being said, I would use the same recipe, but add in tomatoes for a little more richness.

      Rebecca

      Reply
    1. SlaterR Post author

      Hi, Grace,

      Yes! You definitely can and I recommend doing so. I find it difficult to use the whole batch within a week and there’s nothing better than having some homemade broth stored away in a pinch.
      Just be careful about the type of container you freeze in. If you use glass, like myself, you’ll want a container that has a wide mouth, fill it with liquid about 75% of the way, and let freeze uncovered for about 48 hours so that the glass doesn’t shatter. #learnedthehardway

      Sincerely,
      Rebecca

      Reply
  3. MA

    Could onion and garlic skins be used? Are they low FODMAP? Also, I usually add something acidic such as pickle or olive juice or juice from a fermented veggie. This helps minerals to leach from bone to broth.

    Reply
    1. SlaterR Post author

      Hello there! I apologize for the late reply here!

      I’m not sure about the onion and garlic skins – that’s a great question. I stay away from onion and garlic all together. Garlic infused oil is Low FODMaP, but even that gives me pause. You honestly won’t miss the garlic and onion aromatics at all with this recipe. The carrot and celery do a great job.

      And what an interesting idea with the pickle and olive juice! Yum! Thank you for the tip!

      Sincerely,
      Rebecca

      Reply
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