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Homemade Potato Buns (low-FODMAP)

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While Life and Thymez certainly caters (pun intended) to those who follow a Low-FODMAP diet, it’s very obvious if you browse the recipes that they’re meant to be enjoyed by everyone. NS low-FODMAP recipes, while really beneficial for those with Irritable Bowel Syndrome and other tummy issues, doesn’t have to be eaten exclusively by those who follow a low-FODMAP diet. That’s my point. So …. read on and make these bad boys! Enjoy.

See more at www.lifeandthymez.com.

Further Food Commentary:

These Homemade Potato Buns are simply potatoes, eggs, and butter and are appropriate for those following a gluten-free or low-FODMAP diet. The potatoes contribute potassium which helps to maintain fluid and electrolyte balance inside the body. Compared to many store-bought breads, these homemade buns have a lower sodium content and have no added sugars giving you even more reason to give this easy recipe a try.

By Colleen Sideck

Homemade Potato Buns (low-FODMAP)

Stars ( Reviews)

  • Prep Time:15 minutes
  • Cook Time:45 minutes
  • Servings: 20

Ingredients

5 pounds organic russet potatoes
1 stick butter (my preference is salted)
6 eggs (3 whole and 3 yolk)
Salt and Pepper to taste

Instructions

1. Get a pot of water boiling and sprinkle heavily with salt
2. Meanwhile, peel potatoes
3. Cut potatoes in half or fourths and add to boiling salt water
4. Boil potatoes until ready. You should be able to easily poke potato through with fork
5. Drain potatoes in colander
6. Move them to a large round bowl and mash with butter.
7. Add salt and pepper to taste.
8. Let cool slightly
9. In the meantime, get a large baking pan ready with parchment paper and preheat oven to 350.
10. Mix 3 eggs into potatoes using hands. (It will be messy and potatoes will stick to your hands)
11. Form bun shapes and add to baking sheet
12. Wash hands and crack three egg yolk in a small bowl
13. Brush egg yolk on each bun, making sure the tops are well covered
14. Bake in oven until browned, about 45-60 minutes

1. Get a pot of water boiling and sprinkle heavily with salt 2. Meanwhile, peel potatoes 3. Cut potatoes in half or fourths and add to boiling salt water 4. Boil potatoes until ready. You should be able to easily poke potato through with fork 5. Drain potatoes in colander 6. Move them to a large round bowl and mash with butter. 7. Add salt and pepper to taste. 8. Let cool slightly 9. In the meantime, get a large baking pan ready with parchment paper and preheat oven to 350. 10. Mix 3 eggs into potatoes using hands. (It will be messy and potatoes will stick to your hands) 11. Form bun shapes and add to baking sheet 12. Wash hands and crack three egg yolk in a small bowl 13. Brush egg yolk on each bun, making sure the tops are well covered 14. Bake in oven until browned, about 45-60 minutes

Nutrition Information

Per Serving:  Calories: 160; Total Fat: 7 g; Saturated Fat: 3 g; Monounsaturated Fat: 2 g; Polyunsaturated Fat: 1 g; Cholesterol: 67 mg; Sodium: 83 mg; Potassium: 496 mg; Carbohydrate: 21 g;  Fiber: 2 g; Sugar: 1 g; Protein: 4 g
Nutrition Bonus:
Vitamin C: 9%; Iron: 6%; Calcium: 2%;Vit A: 2%
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7 thoughts on “Homemade Potato Buns (low-FODMAP)

  1. Melanie

    In process of making these. They are in oven right now. The consistency didn’t looked right so I was double checking the recipe as I was baking them. The consistency I have didn’t require using my hands to form the dough but simply a spoon which adds up to mashed potatoes that I’m making with eggs. Also, the recipe doesn’t stipulate how many buns this makes. I cut in half as it says 20 servings. I’m thinking this may have needed at least some kind of leavening whether it be baking soda or baking powder but they are already in oven so hoping they surprise me. Many people saying it needs a flour which I agree . However this would be potato bread. Not all GF flours are low FODMAP. Xanthan gum tends to bother most with a true food intolerance with FODMAPs. When replacing gluten, you need to make sure it has 3 quality; protein, starch, and binder. It has the starch from the potatoes, binder is the eggs. It’s just missing a protein flour by guessing. Millet, brown rice, almond, and sorghum are high protein flours. I am thinking next time I’ll try the millet flour since it low FODMAP and possibly my own baking powder without the corn. But I think this is a simple starter lore FODMAP recipe that can tweaked. Who knows, it may surprise me after baking. Fingers crossed🤞

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  2. Rae

    This recipe does not match the picture! Like some of the others have commented, the recipe is definitely missing some key ingredients, such as gf flour, xanthan gum, and some sort of leavening agent. The photo looks like yeasted dinner rolls, but the recipe just sounds like fancy mashed potatoes.

    Reply
  3. Anonymous

    *I’m Crying!* 🙂 I have to eat gf. I miss Wendy’s jr bacon chz burgers w/a potato roll. I’m also a professional chef. This recipe is definitely missing flour (albeit gf) probably a baking soda/ powder combo & usually a lil xantum gum for structure & stability. As soon as I read the recipe steps I was like, “that can’t be right. No way they come out like the picture” 🙂 Thank you all for your comments. Information is always helpful!

    Reply
  4. Ro

    Wish I’d have read the comments. It’s basically mashed potato with a ton of extra steps. Totally disappointed. Won’t make again. It seems like there is a key ingredient missing…

    Reply
  5. Julie

    Like others who commented, I wonder if an ingredient, such as yeast or baking powder, is missing.
    The “rolls” I made from this recipe are basically baked mashed potatoes with a nice golden top.

    Reply
  6. Emie

    They were very good and everyone loved them but it’s a lot of work for something that turns out pretty much like mash potatoes.

    Reply

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