Thai Green Curry Mussels (Dairy-Free, High-Fiber)

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I really love Thai food, so it was no surprise to me that I swooned over this flavorful and light green curry right from the get-go. I don’t usually go wild for mussels, but this dish made me fall in love. The smell, the taste, and the look of this dish is a culinary delight that works wonders on your taste buds and sends your senses flying high.

 

Excerpted with permission from  PESCAN: A Feel Good Cookbook by actress Abbie Cornish and chef Jacqueline King Schiller, which brings their experiences, learning, passion and the joy of their shared food journey together in an extraordinary collection of recipes, stories, tips, inspirations and beautiful photography. Buy here.

Photo Credit: Renata Fuller

Further Food Nutritionist Commentary:

Mussels are known for being high in Vitamin B12 as well as iron, manganese, phosphorus and potassium. Each serving here provides you with 20% of your daily iron needs and 30% of your daily potassium needs. I love how versatile mussels are - here they are paired with rice, but if you are looking for a lighter option pair mussels with veggies or a green salad, enjoy!

By Liz Lederman
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Thai Green Curry Mussels (Dairy-Free, High-Fiber)

  • Prep Time: 20 minutes
  • Cook Time: 15 minutes
  • Servings: 3-4

Ingredients

2 pounds (910 g) mussels
1 lemongrass stalk
2 tablespoons coconut oil
1 onion, thinly sliced
1 shallot, thinly sliced
4 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
3 tablespoons thinly sliced peeled ginger
2 tablespoons green curry paste
1 13.5-ounce can coconut milk
2 tablespoons fish sauce
1 teaspoon sambal oelek or other hot sauce
3 carrots, thinly sliced on the bias
3 celery ribs, thinly sliced on the bias
2 limes, one halved and one quartered
1 cup frozen shelled edamame (soybeans), thawed
3⁄4 cup fresh torn cilantro leaves and tender stems
4 cups cooked rice, or 1 loaf crusty bread

Instructions

  1. Rinse the mussels well under cool tap water, then place them in a bowl of cool water to soak for 20 minutes. When you remove the mussels from the water, lift them out instead
    of pouring them into a strainer, allowing any sand to settleto the bottom of the bowl. Remove any beards by grabbing them between your thumb and forefinger and pulling toward the hinge end of the mussels. Use a firm brush or steel wool to brush off any additional sand or barnacles, if necessary. Rinse the mussels again and set aside.
  2. Remove the rough outer layers of the lemongrass, cut the top off the stalk, leaving 5 inches (12 cm) at the root end, and discard the top. Cut the remaining stalk into 1-inch (2.5-cm) pieces and smash them with the flat side of your knife as if you were smashing garlic.
  3. Heat the oil in a large pot or 12-inch (30.5-cm) sauté pan over medium-high heat. Add the onion and shallot and sauté until softened and just beginning to brown, about 3 minutes.
  4. Add the garlic, lemongrass, ginger, and curry paste and cook, stirring frequently, until the garlic just begins to brown, about 2 minutes. Add the coconut milk, fish sauce, and sambal oelek and stir. Add the mussels, carrots, and celery. Squeeze the juice from the lime halves over the mussels, then add the rinds.
  5. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the mussels open, about 8 minutes. If any mussels stay closed after most of the mussels have opened, move them to the center of the pan, making sure they have direct contact with the pan, and cook for 1 to 2 minutes more. If any remain closed, discard them. Turn off the heat. Stir in the edamame. Sprinkle with the cilantro. Serve over rice or with crusty bread on the side.

FEEL GOOD INGREDIENT // MUSSELS Mussels are a relatively inexpensive, nutritious, and sustainable shellfish. Farmed mussels can even have beneficial effects on marine ecosystems. They contain high levels of B12 and long-chain omega-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA. Mussels also have levels of iron and folic acid similar to those found in red meat.

Rinse the mussels well under cool tap water, then place them in a bowl of cool water to soak for 20 minutes. When you remove the mussels from the water, lift them out instead of pouring them into a strainer, allowing any sand to settleto the bottom of the bowl. Remove any beards by grabbing them between your thumb and forefinger and pulling toward the hinge end of the mussels. Use a firm brush or steel wool to brush off any additional sand or barnacles, if necessary. Rinse the mussels again and set aside. Remove the rough outer layers of the lemongrass, cut the top off the stalk, leaving 5 inches (12 cm) at the root end, and discard the top. Cut the remaining stalk into 1-inch (2.5-cm) pieces and smash them with the flat side of your knife as if you were smashing garlic. Heat the oil in a large pot or 12-inch (30.5-cm) sauté pan over medium-high heat. Add the onion and shallot and sauté until softened and just beginning to brown, about 3 minutes. Add the garlic, lemongrass, ginger, and curry paste and cook, stirring frequently, until the garlic just begins to brown, about 2 minutes. Add the coconut milk, fish sauce, and sambal oelek and stir. Add the mussels, carrots, and celery. Squeeze the juice from the lime halves over the mussels, then add the rinds. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the mussels open, about 8 minutes. If any mussels stay closed after most of the mussels have opened, move them to the center of the pan, making sure they have direct contact with the pan, and cook for 1 to 2 minutes more. If any remain closed, discard them. Turn off the heat. Stir in the edamame. Sprinkle with the cilantro. Serve over rice or with crusty bread on the side. FEEL GOOD INGREDIENT // MUSSELS Mussels are a relatively inexpensive, nutritious, and sustainable shellfish. Farmed mussels can even have beneficial effects on marine ecosystems. They contain high levels of B12 and long-chain omega-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA. Mussels also have levels of iron and folic acid similar to those found in red meat.

Nutrition Information

Per Serving: Calories: 573; Total Fat: 17 g; Saturated Fat: 9 g; Monounsaturated Fat: 1 g; Polyunsaturated Fat: 1 g; Cholesterol: 64 mg; Sodium: 1743 mg; Potassium: 1037 mg; Carbohydrate: 60 g; Fiber: 6 g; Sugar: 4 g; Protein: 37 g

Nutrition Bonus:

Vitamin C: 14%; Vitamin A: 160%; Iron: 20%; Calcium: 24%

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