Mung Bean and Sweet Potato Stew

Print

A couple of months ago I took some classes in Ayurveda and Chinese Medicine and learned that I would benefit from adding warming foods to my diet in order to ease my emotional and physical distress.  At first it seemed counterintuitive to eat warm foods during the heat of summer, but when I began cooking recipes like this, I actually found myself feeling more emotionally grounded as a result.

This soup is a wonderful concoction full of protein, fiber, healthy fats, vitamins and minerals. In addition, the ginger and turmeric, along with the antioxidants in most of the veggies, provide a healthy dose of natural anti-inflammatories.  This soup definitely fits the bill of food as medicine!

Further Food Nutritionist Commentary:

Jocelyn certainly has filled this soup with nutritious ingredients that are helpful for people dealing with a variety of chronic conditions.

Sweet potatoes provide lots of vitamin A to promote eye health and protect skin from harmful UV rays. With more potassium per serving than a banana, sweet potatoes can also help control blood pressure levels. Root veggies also have a natural plant compound, chlorogenic acid, which may help reduce insulin resistance and control blood sugar spikes for people with diabetes.
I like that mung beans are in this recipe! Mung beans are usually eaten as sprouts but cooking the unsprouted beans like any other provides a boost of plant protein, iron and healthy fibers to any meal. As the weather chills, stews are a comforting and easy way to incorporate legumes in meals for a healthy gut.


By Amanda Bontempo, MS, RD, CDN
array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["thumb"]=> string(75) "https://www.furtherfood.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/JOC_2574-150x150.jpg" ["full"]=> string(67) "https://www.furtherfood.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/JOC_2574.jpg" ["attachment_id"]=> int(125) } }

Mung Bean and Sweet Potato Stew

  • Prep Time: 35 minutes
  • Cook Time: 60 minutes
  • Servings: 8

Ingredients

1 cup split and hulled mung beans

1 tablespoon coconut oil

1 onion (peeled and diced)

3 garlic cloves (peeled and minced)

1 tablespoon fresh ginger (minced)

8 cups vegetable stock

2 cups peeled and diced sweet potato

2 large carrots (sliced into rounds)

2 cups swiss chard (or other green of choice; tough stems removed and chopped)

1 bag frozen peas (thawed)

2 teaspoons coconut nectar crystals (or brown sugar) (optional)

2-3 teaspoons garam masala

½ teaspoon turmeric or 4 teaspoons of Daily Turmeric Tonic

¼ teaspoon cayenne

½ can light coconut milk

½ teaspoon sea salt (or to taste)

Cilantro (optional, as garnish, chopped)

Instructions

  1. Run cold water over mung beans in a colander. Drain and set aside.
  2. Warm coconut oil in a large pot. Add onion, garlic, ginger and saute until fragrant. Add stock.
  3. Add the mung beans and the sweet potatoes, then add the rest of the vegetables and the spices. Stir well to combine all the ingredients and bring to a boil.
  4. Reduce heat to a simmer and cook for 45 minutes to 1 hour, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat when everything is soft and cooked through.
  5. Add coconut milk and stir well to combine and heat through. Add salt and adjust any other seasonings before serving. Top each with fresh cilantro.

 

Run cold water over mung beans in a colander. Drain and set aside. Warm coconut oil in a large pot. Add onion, garlic, ginger and saute until fragrant. Add stock. Add the mung beans and the sweet potatoes, then add the rest of the vegetables and the spices. Stir well to combine all the ingredients and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to a simmer and cook for 45 minutes to 1 hour, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat when everything is soft and cooked through. Add coconut milk and stir well to combine and heat through. Add salt and adjust any other seasonings before serving. Top each with fresh cilantro.  

Nutrition Information

Per Serving: Calories: 217; Fat: 4g; Saturated Fat: 3g; Monounsaturated Fat: 0g; Polyunsaturated Fat: 0g; Cholesterol: 0g; Sodium: 709mg; Potassium: 612mg; Carbohydrate: 38g; Fiber: 8g; Sugars: 12g; Protein: 9g

Nutrition Bonus: Vit A: 169%; Vit C: 23%; Iron: 17%

 

Feel the anti-inflammatory effects of Daily Turmeric Tonic

Print
further food collagen

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.

7 thoughts on “Mung Bean and Sweet Potato Stew

  1. Urduja

    While ginger is warming, mung beans are cooling, specifically clearing summer heat and toxicity … a staple in many South East Asian tropical countries. A much healthier way to “detox”.

    Reply
  2. Carol Rooney

    Are you using fresh mung beans here? If I am only able to find them dried (likely), how do I change the amount in the ingredient list? I want to make this over the weekend – looks delish!!

    Reply
    1. Jocweiss Post author

      Hi Carol! These are the dried, split, hulled ones (yellow not green). They look like yellow split peas, which could likely be a good sub if you can’t find the mung beans.

      Reply
    1. Jocweiss Post author

      Hi Allegra! I use the dried, split, hulled mung beans for this (yellow not green). If you can’t find them and want to sub, yellow split peas could work.

      Reply

Send this to friend